Michigan Educational Assessment - MEAP Practice Test

This is a free practice test for the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP).

The MEAP and State Common Core Standards Tests  is a standardized test given to all children in elementary and junior high school.

These Free MEAP Practice Questions were written by the Common Core Standards Testing Experts at TestingMom.com. MI uses the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Test (SBAC Test).

Try the test below, it is instantly scored with breakdowns by grade level so you have a choice of doing all the questions or just the grade level that is applicable.
 

Kindergarten

We’re going to point to colors in the rainbow.  Can you…
 
1. ...point to blue?
2. ...point to orange?

1st Grade

3. Point to ten bird's nests.
Look at all the shapes below.  Can you point to the…
4. ...cylinder?

2nd Grade

5. Which of these is like the other?

3rd Grade

6. The picture below represents the fraction (2/)/3. Which of the following fractions is also represented with the picture below?
7. What fraction represents the number of black sheep among all sheep in the picture below?
8. The seats are arranged in 7 rows. There are 20 seats in each row. What is the total number of seats?

4th Grade

9. Which of the following numbers is the best estimate of the product: 18x32?
Read “The Ant and the Grasshopper” and “The Bear and the Two Travelers” and answer the questions that follow.
       
 
The Ant and the Grasshopper

In a field one summer's day a Grasshopper was hopping about, chirping and singing to its heart's content.  An Ant passed by,
bearing along with great toil an ear of corn he was taking to the nest.
 
"Why not come and chat with me," said the Grasshopper, "instead of toiling and moiling in that way?"
 
"I am helping to lay up food for the winter," said the Ant, "and recommend you to do the same."
 
"Why bother about winter?" said the Grasshopper; we have got plenty of food at present." 
 
But the Ant went on its way and continued its toil. 
 
When the winter came the Grasshopper had no food and found itself dying of hunger, while it saw the ants distributing every day corn and grain from the stores they had collected in the summer.  Then the Grasshopper knew:
 
It is best to prepare for the days of need.
 
The Bear and the Two Travelers

 TWO MEN were traveling together, when a Bear suddenly met them on their path.  One of them climbed up quickly into a tree and concealed himself in the branches.  The other, seeing that he must be attacked, fell flat on the ground, and when the Bear came up and felt him with his snout, and smelt him all over, he held his breath, and feigned the appearance of death as much as he could. 
 
The Bear soon left him, for it is said he will not touch a dead body.  When he was quite gone, the other Traveler descended from the tree, and jocularly inquired of his friend what it was the Bear had whispered in his ear.  "He gave me this advice," his companion replied. 
 
"Never travel with a friend who
deserts you at the approach of danger." 
 
 
 







 
 
10. Which of the following analogies BEST illustrates the characters in The Ant and the Grasshopper?

5th Grade

 “Casey at the Bat”
written by Ernest Lawrence Thayer in 1888
 
The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day;
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play,
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,
A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game.

A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;
They thought, "If only Casey could but get a whack at that--
We'd put up even money now, with Casey at the bat."

But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,
And the former was a hoodoo, while the latter was a cake;
So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat,
For there seemed but little chance of Casey getting to the bat.

But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Blake, the much despisèd, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and men saw what had occurred,
There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.

Then from five thousand throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;
It pounded on the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,
For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.

There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place;
There was pride in Casey's bearing and a smile lit Casey's face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat.

Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt;
Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt;
Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Defiance flashed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip.

And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,
And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped--
"That ain't my style," said Casey. "Strike one!" the umpire said.

From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore;
"Kill him! Kill the umpire!" shouted some one on the stand;
And it's likely they'd have killed him had not Casey raised his hand.

With a smile of Christian charity great Casey's visage shone;
He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the dun sphere flew;
But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said, "Strike two!"

"Fraud!" cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered "Fraud!"
But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.
They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,
And they knew that Casey wouldn't let that ball go by again.

The sneer has fled from Casey's lip, his teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.
And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go.
And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey's blow.

Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright;
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and little children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville--great Casey has struck out.
11. If the speaker of the poem had been Casey, how would the poem have changed? Please choose the best answer.
12. Which line from the poem best demonstrates the theme you chose in Question 2?
13. What does the idiom in the title of the poem mean?

6th Grade

14. The entrance to the local shopping mall is located on the grid at (3, -2). If the hair salon in the shopping mall is located 5 units west and 8 units north of this entrance, what are the coordinates on the grid?
15. Hailey went hiking. She started the hike at an elevation of 243 feet. She then climbed down 782 feet. When she was ready to leave she climbed back up 118 feet. What was Hailey's elevation at the end of the hiking trip?

7th Grade

16. There are 8 apples in the bag. 2 of the apples in the bag are green and the rest are red. Which of the following represents the fraction of red apples in the bag?
17. The temperature increased from -3^o C in the morning to 5^o C in the afternoon. How many degrees did the temperature change?

8th Grade

18. 1/2 of all the apples in the bag are green; 1/3 are red and 3 are yellow. What is the total number of apples in the bag?
Read “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Ah Sunflower” and answer the questions that follow.

 

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

By:  Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. 
 

Ah Sunflower

By:  William Blake

Ah Sunflower, weary of time,
Who countest the steps of the sun;
Seeking after that sweet golden clime
Where the traveller's journey is done;

Where the Youth pined away with desire,
And the pale virgin shrouded in snow,
Arise from their graves, and aspire
Where my Sunflower wishes to go! 










 
 
 
19. Which poem accurately reflects these poems' point of views?
20. Read the following line from "Ah Sunflower".
....Where the Youth pined away with desire...
What does the underlined word MOST LIKELY mean?

Common Core Standards Practice Test

Michigan Educational Assessment MEAP Testing


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